Apron in Jacquard with Black Leather Finishes

How it is made

  • Jacques’ Atelier in Paris

    In the heart of one of Paris’ oldest neighbourhoods, le Marais, the atelier from Jacques hides in the courtyard of a former monastery from the 14th century. Jacques works in the atelier since 2003. His Franco-Japanese girlfriend recently created a little outside garden for him.

  • Selecting the textile

    To allow for small production units, whilst guaranteeing a high quality textile, Jacques selects the textile for the aprons amongst the leftovers from the big French fashion houses, such as Louis Vuitton, Givenchy, Balmain and Valentino. .

  • Designing the pattern

    A small Parisian atelier that Jacques collaborates with makes the design and cut. They created an ergonomic shape inspired by contemporary clothing, with pockets from the sides and top and a little slit at the front that allows movement to comfortably wear the apron.

  • p-slide1.jpg

    Selecting the leather for the harness

    Jacques sources this specific black leather from an Italian tannery. Before he starts working, he chooses the leather parts with care, striving to take the most beautiful part and creating as little unused leftovers as possible.

  • p-slide1.jpg

    Cutting the leather

    For the apron, Jacques needs to cut seven different pieces of leather. For that, he places the pattern on the leather and cuts it by hand. This stage requires particular concentration and precision.

  • Finishing the edges

    The edges are carved with a leather beveller, which allows rounding the edges and to give a three-dimensional appearance to a two-dimensional surface. They are then finished with sand paper to obtain a smooth, finished look.

  • Spawning the leather

    To prepare for sewing the leather and the textile together, Jacques utilises a diamond chisel to stitch the marks. This tool allows creating holes that are clean and consistent.

  • Hand sewing the leather

    Jacques sews the leather pieces and the textile together after he inserted a small hook, which is normally used for horse saddles. He then sews the leather pieces together to form the harness, which can then be attached to the textile via the hooks.

Sign up to our newsletter

Be the first to find out about offers, invites to pop-up shops or when we have new items in store!